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Blog Oficial de Turismo de Gran Canaria

Canary knives

Cutting edge tradition

Every knife that Francisco Torres makes is a wholly unique piece, and proof of Gran Canaria’s deep-rooted craftwork tradition.

Every Canary knife tells a story. Some of them can cut short our breath with their steel blades. Rafael Torres Osorio, a resident of Santa María de Guía, in Gran Canaria, forged well deserving fame as an artisan knife-maker, while his son, Francisco Torres Rodríguez, delicately holds up a knife that is able to slit through the patterns of time. “This is the last one my father designed in 1992”, he reveals with emotion and pride etched on his face. The handle, a replica made by himself, is pure silver and goldsmithing genius, a combination of animal horn, precious metals, know-how and patience.


Vegueta Market

The marvels of Vegueta Market

A piece of aromatic reality unfolds before visitors’ eyes at Vegueta Market in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria.

“That’s just eight euros, madam. I’ll put the fish in two bags and that’ll be easier for you to carry. Have a good day...” Pleasant chit-chat, the wooden model boat hanging from the side and some attractive fresh produce from one of the fish counters begin to provide an insight into Vegueta Market in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria as we enter its centuries-old facilities. This area, over and above a colourful display of wonderful wares, opens the door to visitors providing access to a kind of theatre, which, nevertheless, is an authentic piece of aromatic and bustling reality.


The Canary Museum

The Canary Museum, a day spent in the company of mummies in Gran Canaria

The Canary Museum has a surprise in store in the district of Vegueta, where there is an air of a grand scientific world.

There are mummies out there, and not just within the thick walls of the Pyramids of Egypt and in Hollywood films. In the case of Gran Canaria, there some lucky individuals enjoying the privilege of inhabiting number 2, calle Doctor Verneau in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria. Don’t be alarmed. They don’t live in a private residence, and you won’t bump into them at the bus stop or at the corner coffee shop. This address belongs to the Canary Museum, a century-old institution founded back in 1879, where there is an air of a great scientific world that proliferated all over Europe during the 19th century.


Castle of La Luz

Gran Canaria is a Chirino spiral

The Martín Chirino Foundation, named after the world famous sculptor born in Gran Canaria, awaits your visit at the fascinating Castle of La Luz.

Nobody had thought of sculpturing the wind. That is, until Martín Chirino, one of the leading sculptors to have emerged over the last few decades, came along and did just that. The artist was born in 1925 in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, at the heart of a family linked with shipyards. For this reason, the sea and the Canaries’ landscape fused with iron and bronze since his early childhood. This is how his first iconic spiral figure came about.


San Juan, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria

San Juan, the fire of life

Gran Canaria combines fire, sea, festivals and tradition when celebrating La Noche de San Juan - St John’s Eve or Midsummer’s Eve.

The shortest nights of the year are also the most intense in Gran Canaria. The sea, the moon and fire melt into one on the island the night before the feast of St John, every 23rd June (Midsummer’s Eve), to experience an annual ritual of joy, hope and purification that is celebrated particularly intense in this corner of the Atlantic. This is where the elements of Nature and the people of Gran Canaria come together to hold an unforgettable evening where boredom is the first thing to burn away on the fire.


‘Gran Canaria en los ojos de Pepe Dámaso’ (‘Gran Canaria through the eyes of Pepe Dámaso)

Pepe Dámaso, light of Gran Canaria

Several paintings  by the painter Pepe Dámaso light up Triana Tourist Information Office, in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria.

When he comes on stage, one gets the feeling that the air lights up and a warm breeze starts to blow, as when the rays of the morning sun creep into a room with views of the ocean. Pepe Dámaso, born in Agaete (Gran Canaria) in 1933 and one of the Canary Islands most universal artists, is the ambassador of light and colour of his island birthplace. Pepe says that one has to “emborregar” (a local word for rolling in the sand) tourism in flour and give tourists a taste of fried moray eel, “toasted and salty like the sea”. When the painter speaks, his Gran Canaria speaks through him.


Agüimes

Agüimes, the art of life in Gran Canaria

The historic town centre of Villa de Agüimes, in the southeast of Gran Canaria, is a heady and empowering setting.

Life is art in Agüimes. Every corner of its old town centre looks like it has been chiselled out especially. These painstaking efforts have created a setting in which tradition and history have melted into one. A whole grid of main streets, backstreets, squares and alleyways have forged a quite heady beauty.


Perojo Street

Calle Perojo, the street in Gran Canaria that runs on forever

Calle Perojo, with its Site of Cultural Interest award, features a range of colourful, architectural styles and a passion for detail in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria.

Architecture, colour and a passion for detail are the attractions along Calle Perojo in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, a street that has been awarded the title of Site of Cultural Interest (BIC in Spanish) in the category of Historical Location, in recognition of its great beauty and artistic value. A walk around this emblematic street in the island’s capital is to delve into an elegant environment in which past and present go hand in hand to provide a memorable urban experience.


Risco Caído

Risco Caído, Gran Canaria’s Lost Temple

Risco Caído, discovered in 1996, is a shining example of Gran Canaria’s extraordinary archaeological legacy.

There are many timeless, mysterious places hidden away in the depths of Gran Canaria. Here, on an island that is visited by millions of tourists every year, long lost secrets continue to come to light up in the mountains. One of the most remarkable cases is the almogarén, a sacred site at Risco Caído, a place where aborigenes on the island would carry out rituals linked to astronomical cycles, with a sacred symbolism, at the heart of the colossal volcanic crater of Tejeda.


Las Palmas de Gran Canaria

Vegueta, a stroll around the New World

The founding neighbourhood of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria offers history, culture, cuisine and the odd enigma.

A stroll around the district of Vegueta begins at a very distinct point, back to a time over five centuries ago. At the foot of Guiniguada Ravine, gigantic palm trees rose up and served as a beacon to guide boats bringing in Spanish troops deployed at this point since 1478. The roots of those first historic palm trees that stood tall in what we now call Vegueta are also the roots to the name of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria.



A craftswoman working in her crafts workshop

Artisan pottery and Gastronomy, a love that shines through in Gran Canaria

They say a recipe itself doesn’t have a soul, rather it is the chef that provides it. Nevertheless, nobody doubts that crockery is a fundamental part of a recipe today: it enhances the dish, while each piece adds a dash of beauty to the end product.

This opinion is shared among critics and gastronomic experts all around the world, so much so that neuroscience has taken it on to study just how the shape of crockery, along with its colour, material and density all influence how, what and how much we eat.